Friday, March 20, 2015

Introducing Brenda Whiteside



Writing murder mysteries is all in a day's work until an obsessed fan brings Phoebe's stories to life.



Mystery writer, Phoebe Anderson, owes her success to killing her first husband on paper seventeen years earlier. Now, someone has actually done it. When she decides to take a few days away on the ranch of her best friend’s brother-in-law, she doesn’t expect romance to find her...or murder to follow her.

Mason Meadowlark is happy with his wild cowboy ways, avoiding love since the death of his baby and the end of his marriage twenty years ago. When Phoebe shows up, he fights to control his emotions, but soon wonders if she just might be worth the risk of opening his heart again.


With an obsessed fan close on her heels, Phoebe is thrown into her own murder mystery…and the next target on his list is Mason.


You can find this cowboy romance at
Amazon:

TWRP:

Sunday, March 8, 2015

What Are You Reading Now?



I am reading What Janie Saw by Pamela Tracy. Harlequin's Heartwarming line publishes clean, well-written books that can be shared by mothers and daughters. This particular one is a romantic suspense.

Harlequin Heartwarming May 2014
The last person she wanted... was the only one who could keep her safe...
Janie Vincent had no use for cops.  They'd never done her any favors, but when she uncovers a lead into the disappearance of a girl at the college where she's a teaching assistant, suddenly Janie's life depends on the officers of Scorpion Ridge.  And one in particular: Sheriff Rafael Salazar.  
Rafe knows how much destruction a missing-persons case can cause a family, and so to solve this case, he's determined to stick to Janie like glue.  She's clearly not a fan of the 24/7 surveillance, but he intends to break down her distrust.  And maybe they'll discover what Janie saw can be the key to healing them both.

RT reviewer says:  Tracy’s story is a suspenseful and entertaining one readers will enjoy as they follow the twists and turns.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Do We Need A Hero?

I finished watching my recording of the season finale of How to Get Away with Murder and I felt conflicted. I enjoyed the twists and turns. I have since the beginning, but I have been losing interest in the series. After the finale, I was leaning towards not watching it again. On the other hand, I do enjoy those twists and turns. I thought about the shows I usually record. They are crime dramas with a hero or heroine. The good guys go after the bad guys and win. I was left wondering whether or not a show needs a hero?

Romance writers and readers are used to having a hero and a happy ending. We leave our books or television with a sense that good overcame evil and all is right with the world.

Then I remembered Breaking Bad. I believe the character development was superb. We watched the nice guy, a teacher, turn bad for good reasons. Eventually, he had to admit he reached a point where he enjoyed being bad because he was good at it. But even when he was bad, he still protected Jesse and his family, including his brother-in-law, who worked for the DEA.

I get the impression that Annalise on How to Get Away with Murder would throw anyone under the bus if it fit into her scheme to win. I feel sorry for the character she had affair with. He seems to be a nice guy who has suffered the most from knowing her. The students who work for her have been dragged to the dark side as well. I feel sorry for them, but that isn't enough to keep me watching. I need a hero on this show. It is a popular series, so I am sure many people do not agree with me. We are all entitled to our own opinion.

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Promotion on Twitter

You have a book for sale, now what? It won;t sell itself. You need to market, promote.

While tweeting and retweeting on Twitter, I have come across book promoters. I haven;t used any, but I plan to keep an eye on them and determine if they are worth using. I also don't plan on spending much money, so I'll check their price schedules. I'm not recommending these people, but I will share their names so you can do your own research.

Author Retweet
Free Book Promotions
Review My Ebook
Elite Book Promotions
AllBookBot
Free Kindle Books
NovelAuthors
Tweet Your Book

If you have any information about this list, I would appreciate the feedback.

Good luck,

Sunday, December 28, 2014

New Year's Resolutions


Every New Year's Eve the topic of resolutions comes up. I resist making them, but usually give in. This year I've decided to think of them as continued growth in areas that concern me.

1, Organizing my home. I've started cleaning out the old already. I finally gave up my VHS tapes. Well, most of them. They went to Good Will today along with old cups and glasses I rarely use. I still need to place old pictures into albums and scan paperwork I want to toss.

2.  Increase my writing time. I've decided to keep the laptop on my lap while watching TV if I haven't written that day. This will allow me to open the file and work at a leisurely pace. I think I procrastinate sometimes because writing is work even if it is my passion. I don't know anyone who writes a perfect draft every time.

3. Increase promotion. My new laptop is helping tremendously. The touchscreen has allowed me to place my social media on my start screen. The links are at my fingertips. This too can be accomplished during TV time. Right now, we are watching The Sopranos.

4. Diet. I already reduced my sugar intake which helped me drop ten pounds. Next, I am going to reduce snacking. Changing one area of my life at a time is the key for me.

I hope your new year is everything you want it to be whether you make a resolution or not.

Sunday, December 21, 2014

A Lesson From Reese



Today was one of those days when The Universe conspires to send a message. On Facebook, I read a post from a writer who bashed the ability of well-known authors. She felt they should be cast aside to make room for newbies. Her frustration came through loud and clear even if I don't agree with such posts.

Later, I watched 60 Minutes. Reese Witherspoon spoke about the difficult time she went through after her divorce. Despite receiving an Oscar, she was having trouble finding projects that she was passionate about. Her career floundered. She was probably as frustrated as the writer on Facebook today. Reese finally decided to start her own production company and optioned two books before they were published. (I assume she received advanced reader copies.) She wanted to make movies that mattered to her. The first movie she produced was Gone Girl. Her new company made millions.

Reese reminded me that I need to write books that mean something to me, not just books that might get published by the big guys. Traditional publishers are going to stick predominately with the authors who sell millions. They are in business to make money. I don't need to be another Carol Higgins Clark or Nora Roberts to be happy, although it would be nice. I just need to know I am tapping into my creativity, using my voice, and putting out a quality product. Today, authors are fortunate. There are many avenues we can take to publish our books. We don't have to sink money into a production company to share our craft with the world the way Reese did. I don't know about the woman on Facebook, but I plan to focus on writing what makes me happy and not worry about who publishes it or how much money I make.

Sunday, November 2, 2014

Learning From Movies - The Fury




I am not a big fan of war movies, but I agreed to see this one with my husband. I'm glad to say the acting was good. The dialogue was usually believable. Unfortunately, most of the plot was predictable. At least it was for me. That could be because I'm a writer.

When they introduced the young soldier who wouldn't shoot anyone, I knew the story would center on how he becomes a killer. When the main jerk in the movie told him he was a good man, I knew the jerk would die soon. When they decided to face down over a hundred Nazi soldiers by themselves, I predicted everyone would die except for the young soldier.

To be fair, I did not predict that this handful of men would decide to face down over a hundred German soldiers near the end.

What can writers do to keep their plot points from becoming predictable? Write a list of possible twists in the story until you start to come up with ones that are different, yet believable, and true to the characters. You can also ask a friend what they think will happen next in the story and if they guess your plot, change it.

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